Posts Tagged ‘VPR’

The first casualty of class warfare…

March 10th, 2011

Really, it is too much.  This morning on Vermont Public Radio I listened to Jim Douglas’ apologia for the shame of Wisconsin.  VPR likes to hire “former” politicians as commentators, as if the politician’s perspective were under-represented in our civic discourse, overwhelmed by the thundering voices of the poor, the marginal and the disenfranchised.  The commentary was presented in Douglas’ usual soothing tones; if you could bottle this man’s voice, you could use it as cough syrup.  He availed himself of the familiar conservative Republican tactic of depicting the facts not as they are but as they might be on a planet where they support the conclusions that he would prefer to draw.  Thus, he described himself as a believer in collective bargaining and implied that, as a former union member, he is a friend to organized labor.  He described Governor Scott Walker and the Wisconsin Senate as motivated by concern for the state budget.

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We do art because art is what we do

October 12th, 2010

On VPR last week I heard a reporter ask Vermont film maker and arts promoter Jay Craven to explain how the arts can strengthen a community.  I thought the question was a perfect example of our society’s cluelessness about art and its place in human life.  What surprised me was the lameness of Craven’s answer.  Jay Craven is an accomplished artist with interesting and important things to say, but on this occasion he launched into the conventional thoughtless high-minded mooing you get whenever Americans start talking in public about the role of art: art makes you a better person by opening you to different points of view and making you more perceptive and sensitive and tolerant and blah blah blah.  Well, maybe.  Some art might have that effect upon some people, sometimes.  But is that why we do art?  For its medicinal/therapeutic effect?  Because, like eating spinach or taking echinacea in flu season, it’s good for you?

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Are you listening, Barrie Dunsmore?

September 24th, 2010

A gurney used in Indiana for lethal injections

National Public Radio reported this morning on yesterday’s execution of Teresa Lewis by the state of Virginia.  The reporter, stationed outside the death chamber, gave us an eyewitness description of Ms. Lewis’ demeanor as she  went in.  According to the reporter, she looked scared.  The reporter repeated this several times.  That was evidently the strongest impression on the reporter’s mind.

On the same broadcast, our local station, Vermont Public Radio, carried a commentary by a former network news luminary about the decline of journalism in the face of blogging and internet media.  He opined that people seek out coverage that they find congenial in preference to  journalism that tells it like it is.

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