Posts Tagged ‘Republicans’

Parte per te stesso

July 17th, 2011

I was going to begin this sentence with the phrase “in these times of massive lunacy,” but when, looking at the national political scene, could one not have described it thus?  Just the other day, Senator Orin Hatch (Shit-for-brains, Utah) trotted out once again the idea of a constitutional amendment requiring the federal government to have a balanced budget, just a bare two years after the federal government saved his ass and everybody else’s from economic catastrophe by (cue drums) deficit spending.  Meanwhile, the liberals’ Great Hope Obama calls for “shared sacrifice” to reduce the deficit, with cuts to social support programs coupled with raised taxes on some of the playtoys of the rich, as if there were some parity involved.  It brings to mind Anatole France’s quip that “The law, in its majestic equality, forbids the rich and the poor alike to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets, and to steal bread.”  At the same time, on the right wing the Tea Partyers and their associated stooges for the megarich like Eric Cantor (Dickhead, Virginia) insist that the social contract should not apply to them, at least not insofar as they are expected to contribute to society – they’re perfectly happy to receive government benefits –  while across the room the progressives flounder in a myopia which cannot perceive the difference between Haley Barbour and Barak Obama.  A plague on all their houses.  As did Dante seven hundred years ago, I declare myself a Party of One.

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The first casualty of class warfare…

March 10th, 2011

Really, it is too much.  This morning on Vermont Public Radio I listened to Jim Douglas’ apologia for the shame of Wisconsin.  VPR likes to hire “former” politicians as commentators, as if the politician’s perspective were under-represented in our civic discourse, overwhelmed by the thundering voices of the poor, the marginal and the disenfranchised.  The commentary was presented in Douglas’ usual soothing tones; if you could bottle this man’s voice, you could use it as cough syrup.  He availed himself of the familiar conservative Republican tactic of depicting the facts not as they are but as they might be on a planet where they support the conclusions that he would prefer to draw.  Thus, he described himself as a believer in collective bargaining and implied that, as a former union member, he is a friend to organized labor.  He described Governor Scott Walker and the Wisconsin Senate as motivated by concern for the state budget.

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